Federal biologists will review endangered status for Idaho's caribou

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will review the status of the southern Selkirk Mountains population of woodland caribou in response to a petition to remove it from Endangered Species Act.

Bonner County and the Idaho State Snowmobile Association filed a petition earlier this year to remove the caribou from the endangered list. Brandon Middleton, the Pacific Legal Foundation attorney who filed the petition, said reindeer and caribou around the world are the same species.

U.S. expected to lose millions of acres of forests to development in next 50 years

The U.S. is expected to lose 16 million to 34 million of acres of forest by 2060 to urban growth and development, the U.S. Forest Service predicts.

The expanding population, increased urbanization, and changing land-use patterns will cut into privately-owned forests and that will mean a loss of clean water, wildlife habitat, forest products and recreation. The Forest Service 10-year assessment found urban and developed land areas in the U.S. will increase 41 percent by 2060.

1355846225 U.S. expected to lose millions of acres of forests to development in next 50 years Idaho Statesman Copyright 2014 Idaho Statesman . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

New soot standard probably won't push Treasure Valley over air quality limits

The Obama administration’s new lower air quality standard for soot probably won’t require new actions to keep the Treasure Valley legal.

The new annual standard is 12 micrograms per cubic meter of air, down from the current 15 micrograms per cubic meter, calculated over three years. The Treasure Valley soot levels was 7.4 micrograms per meter for the period from 2009 through 2011.

Soot, also called pm 2.5, is microscopic particles that are breathed deep into your lungs and can lead to heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks.

Boise Forest Service researcher leads scientists saying drought, high temps are new normal

Boise Forest Service researcher Dan Isaak and a team of federal scientists report that record setting drought and high temperatures may become the “new normal” that managers of aquatic resources in the Rocky Mountains have to contend with as the century progresses.

1355774019 Boise Forest Service researcher leads scientists saying drought, high temps are new normal Idaho Statesman Copyright 2014 Idaho Statesman . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Idaho's slickspot peppergrass endangered species victory reverses WWP court victory

Chief U.S. Magistrate Candy Dale followed up her earlier decision that listing the slickspot peppergrass was flawed by removing it from the threatened species list Thursday.

Her decision came after Idaho Gov. Butch Otter used the same playbook that the Western Watersheds Project and Advocates for the West used, going to court to get the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list slickspot peppergrass.

Now for the third time, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has to decide whether to list the annual flowering bush that grows in wet areas of Southwest Idaho’s sagebrush steppe desert.

1354968222 Idaho's slickspot peppergrass endangered species victory reverses WWP court victory Idaho Statesman Copyright 2014 Idaho Statesman . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Study supports Greater Yellowstone's selenium position but press release misleads on 2-headed fish

A new study supports environmentalists’ call for keeping federal limits on selenium in the Blackfoot River watershed at current or even lower levels than they are now.

Selenium levels in the southeast Idaho stream consistently exceeded even the industry proposed guidelines for protection of fish and wildlife, said Justin Conley, from North Carolina State University.

1354841554 Study supports Greater Yellowstone's selenium position but press release misleads on 2-headed fish Idaho Statesman Copyright 2014 Idaho Statesman . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tribes turn down Gateway West route forcing BLM to shift south

The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes have vetoed running the Gateway West electric transmission line across the Fort Hall Indian reservation in eastern Idaho.

The tribe’s decision forced the Bureau of Land Management, which is conducting the environmental review of the proposed power line, to move the line south through Power County. The new preferred alternative, only out this week runs on 75 to 80 percent private land through the Rockland Valley and Neely areas.

Can ranchers become rangers roaming the public range?

Is it time to consider a new cowboy for the 21st Century?

Is this the moment for ranchers and conservationists to seek a new direction?

The Society of Range Management is commemorating a century of their science, which like forestry and other early conservation studies was devoted to maximizing resources for human use. Western rangelands then were suitable for only raising livestock.

Putting Idaho in competition for nuclear waste site premature, Sayer says

A recommendation that Idaho join the scramble seeking federal designation as an interim nuclear waste storage site, would be premature, Idaho Department of Commerce Chief Jeff Sayer says.

Idahoan Carole King gets star on Hollywood Walk of Fame

Idaho resident Carole King was awarded a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame Monday, recognizing her more than 50 years of singing, songwriting and performing.

King, who lives in the White Cloud Mountains near Clayton, told the Idaho Statesman she is excited to hear Carole King Day declared in Hollywood.

"I am so thrilled to be getting this star and thrilled to be representing Idaho on the Hollywood Walk of Fame," King said.

She was introduced as an Idahoan as she was awarded the 2,486th star. Her work for wilderness preservation also was noted.

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