Senate panel approves bill to expand toxics regulation on party-line vote (updated)

The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee sent a bill that would reform the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act to the floor today but Republicans said the vote delayed efforts to get a bipartisan bill passed.

The bill, which would expand the list of toxic chemicals regulated by federal agencies, has surprisingly strong bipartisan support in Idaho, according to a press release from Brian Cronin at 360 Strategies. Cronin, who decided not to run for reelection as a state representative, is representing a group called Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families.

The Safe Chemicals Act would create a chemical management system that regulates potential hazards and provides stronger protections to human and environmental health. Supporters in Idaho include Rep. Janice McGeachin, R-Idaho Falls, Chair of the House Health & Welfare Committee), Sen. Chuck Winder, R-Boise, Assistant Majority Leader, Sen. Mitch Toryanski, R-Boise, Rep. John Rusche, D-Lewiston, House Minority Leader, Rep. Cherie Buckner-Webb, D-Boise, and former Speaker of the House Bruce Newcomb.

Idaho Republican Sen. Mike Crapo has been one of the committee members working on bipartisan version of the bill. But Democrat's decision to take the bill to a vote before all of the changes were approved forced the party-line vote, said Crapo's communications director Lindsay Nothern.

A new report shows the toxics' role in the rising incidence of certain types of cancer, reproductive harm, infertility, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, learning disabilities, and asthma.

“Evidence that chemical exposures significantly contribute to disease and disability burdens in the United States is undeniable, strong, and continues to grow,” said Ted Schettler, science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network.

The new report also highlights the costs associated with exposures to toxic chemicals in children. Researchers conservatively estimated that the annual cost of environmentally-attributed diseases in American children was $76.6 billion per year, or 3.5% of U.S. health care costs, in 2008.

1343249610 Senate panel approves bill to expand toxics regulation on party-line vote (updated) Idaho Statesman Copyright 2014 Idaho Statesman . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Good stuff for Wednesday

The Rock's awarding winning writing:
"Three leading physicians said earlier this week that the evidence that unregulated chemicals contribute to chronic diseases in America has grown substantially in recent years."
***

Leading physicians? Leading what?

"unregulated" vs regulated-
It is good to know the "regulated" chemicals are not contributing to 'diseases'.

***
The award here is for "The Worst".

garbage day

Rock writes this:
"A new report shows the toxics role in the rising incidence of certain types of cancer, reproductive harm, infertility, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, learning disabilities, and asthma."

The press release is this:
"The report highlights significant peer-reviewed research on the role chemicals play in the rising incidence of certain types of cancer, reproductive harm, infertility, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, learning disabilities, and asthma."

***

"The reports shows the __ role in the rising incidence

is different than

"the reports highlights research on the role"

Once again, Rocko reads a press release and changes the content.

Copy-Paste

"Researchers conservatively estimated that the annual cost of environmentally-attributed diseases in American children was $76.6 billion per year, or 3.5% of U.S. health care costs, in 2008."

***
Rocko, if you are going to use the EXACT same sentence as the press release you should include quotes, so readers know it is the work of someone else.

Same goes for your use of their "Three leading physicians" statement.

http://www.saferchemicals.org/2012/07/recent-science-strengthens-case-that-chemicals-impact-chronic-diseases-in-america.html

Who is on first?

"Cronin, who decided not to run for reelection as a state representative, is working for a group called Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families."

***
Who decided not to run?

Employer?

"Brian Cronin at 360 Strategies. Cronin, who decided not to run for reelection as a state representative, is working for a group called Safer Chemicals, Healthy "

****
Cronin at 360 Stategies

AND

Cronin is working for Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families

So he is working for BOTH organizations?

Stop hoggin all the jobs Brian!

Time for an Update!

Oh hey, the bill passed the committee today.

Toxics regulation

"“Evidence that chemical exposures significantly contribute to disease and disability burdens in the United States is undeniable, strong, and continues to grow,” said Ted Schettler, science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network."
One source of toxics contaminaton being kept under cover is that fact of radiation-contaminated fish off of our western shores, thanks to the nuke fiasco in Japan.

See this Vancouver BC news article about it:
http://www.straight.com/article-735051/vancouver/japans-irradiated-fish-worry-bc-experts

The article also points out that so far neither Canadian nor US government relevant agencies have even begun to investigate. Japan ships tons of fish to our west coasts for sale. If people eat a lot of irradiated seafood, they are in for a lot of illness down the road. This is a top public health problem waiting in line, after the pesticides and all the other stuff the new law might regulate.