Waiting on a waiver: Idaho and No Child Left Behind

Today, the Obama administration granted 10 states waivers from portions of the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Idaho didn't make the list today -- which is something of a surprise, given state school superintendent Tom Luna's criticism of the law.

The explanation, however, is simple enough. Idaho still working on its application. The second round of waiver applications is due on Feb. 21.

“Idaho chose to apply in the second round and use the additional time to work with stakeholder groups on the development of Idaho’s new accountability plan,” the State Department of Education said in a blog post today. “We hope to hear back on Idaho’s waiver application this spring and join the other 10 states in being granted a waiver from certain provisions of No Child Left Behind.”

For more about today’s waivers, here’s an article from the Los Angeles Times.

And here’s what the state Department of Education had to say today:

President Obama announced today that 10 states have received waivers from certain provisions of No Child Left Behind today.

The states awarded waivers are: Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.

These states all applied in the first round in November 2011. Idaho is submitting its waiver application in the second round, due by Feb. 21.

Idaho chose to apply in the second round and use the additional time to work with stakeholder groups on the development of Idaho’s new accountability plan.

Staff from the State Department of Education held focus groups with parents, legislators, teachers, principals, superintendents, and school board members in October. Staff met with representatives of all education stakeholder groups, including the Idaho Education Association, Idaho Association of School Administrators, Idaho School Boards Association, Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs and Idaho Indian Education Committee. The Department also has worked with members of the State Board of Education throughout the process.

In January, the Department published a draft of the state’s waiver application on its website and opened it up for public comment for 21 days.
The state made several changes based on this feedback. The final application is posted online now.

Idaho’s application will go before the State Board of Education for approval on February 15. After that, it will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, prior to the deadline on February 21.
We hope to hear back on Idaho’s waiver application this spring and join the other 10 states in being granted a waiver from certain provisions of No Child Left Behind.

With a waiver, Idaho will create its new system of increased accountability based on higher standards, academic growth, and improved performance evaluations for educators – all key components of the Students Come First reform laws. These laws have positioned Idaho well to implement its new system of increased accountability.

A waiver will get Idaho out from under the current No Child Left Behind law, which only measures states based on proficiency – or how many students pass the test. Instead, under the new accountability system, Idaho will be able to measure school performance with multiple metrics including academic growth, graduation rates and student participation in advanced opportunities.

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so

Does this mean the teachers will still hate Luna and NCLB at the same time?

Couldn't

It means Luna couldn't get it done.

?

GEt what done?
It sounds like he/his office is doing the teachers a good thing here.

NCLB

Read the article again- the Dep't of Ed opened a draft application on its' website and took comments on how to complete it- I'll bet there were plenty of comments from teachers. It will be ready to go soon, if it hasn't been submitted already.

Boise Schools wants your $

Boise SD plans to pass their 5 yr tax increase on March 13 to spend your money. They use language like classroom reduction to cover up the fact that the administrators are just plain tired of having their compensation reduced by 5 days, even if they have received 1 time pay bonus'.

Rather than asking for a 1 yr targeted tax increase for K-3 classrooms or specific content areas like math, science and reading... No they want to increase property owners taxes for the next 5 yrs so they can spend. Renters get off free. Say NO on March 13

Didn't Luna run on

Ddn't Luna originally run on the fact that he helped craft NCLB? He was for it before he was against it I guess.

After Howard Spanked his assets

He was paid nearly a quarter million by the W Bush admin to sell NCLB to the states. He's just another political Heidi Fleiss.

nice Brad Paisley reference

in the title, incidentally. Love the song and the video is awesome. Just wanted you to know that at least one person got it. :)