Pleo gets a bad review

Since it was first introduced, Pleo the robotic dinosaur has received almost universal acclaim.

But last week, Pleo didn’t exactly charm a New York Times reviewer. David Pogue summed the toy up as a “novelty” that wears off quickly.

Having met Caleb Chung, who invented Pleo with a team of engineers in his Eagle lab, I at first felt the reviewer was being a little too harsh.

But as I thought about it, I do agree with the overall point of his column. I still think Pleo is more than a “novelty.” On a broader scale it does a lot toward developing the whole idea of an artificial life, which as Chung will tell you is one of the reasons for its development.

But as the reviewer points out most technology gets old way too quickly. But in my mind that is what makes technology such an attractive industry.

We may grow tired of the next great tech gadget quickly, but we don’t give up on the technology. Instead we look for the next big thing and we’re willing to spend the dollars to find it.

Just think about what we have in our own lives. How many of us upgrade our cell phones ever two years? I do. But to be honest, I don’t know why. The cell phone I had two years ago, which is now collecting dust in my closet, still does everything I need, but the lure of the new phone with the better camera and online access was too much to ignore.

Well guess what? I think I’ve used the camera a couple times at most. And after the free trial of online access ended, I haven’t once used my phone to surf the Web.

At home my kids have boxes of cast-off technology that isn’t getting any use. There are dozens of Play Station games that haven’t been touched since buying the new Wii. And I hate to even think about the hundreds of dollars I spent on those games that will probably end up in a garage sale this summer for a buck or two.

And don’t get me started on computers and software. I’m already thinking of buying a new computer. I’m not sure why, but somehow I’ll probably convince myself I can’t live without the latest technology.

Surrounding my computer, I have dozens of versions of software programs. I keep buying the updates to certain programs even though I haven’t even used all the features of the first program.

Try as I might, I can’t seem to get off the technology treadmill. I keep buying even when I know I should stop. But I also know I’m not alone. People pour millions if not billions of dollars a year into buying new technology.

And I doubt that Chung is too upset about the bad review. If anything he’s probably hard at work developing the next generation Pleo that everyone will just have to have.

Donate your cellphone...

Cameras are not the reason I'd buy one. You can supposedly access the telephone systems of the world with it. If I want a picture, I have a camera, which can't be hacked and all my photos put on the web or used to blackmail me, and which I'm less likely to put down and walk away from forever if I'm clumsy.

I'm sure they are great for the latest pic of your grandkids or lover, but they are ephemera or whatever.

Clever hook for the NYT writer, but...

at Pleo's (and Caleb's) expense. Having met Pleo, I wouldn't want to break the little rascal's heart...

But the reviewer kinds missed the whole point - that Pleo's programming will grow alongside the Pleo community. It didn't look to me that the writer looked into that at all. Did he even look at http://www.pleoworld.com ? ***

The key for Pleo's future is building that community - and that won't happen overnight. THAT is the interesting story anyway - a "toy" for the new world of Web 2.0 [Ken?]

As a cognitive psychologist who dabbles in neuroscience, the programming is a treat (scarier than you might realize, lol) but the psychology of a growing, evolving web community around Pleo should be fascinating.

As an entrepreneur... I'm both envious and proud. Ugo, Ugobe! Cheers, Caleb - NK

*** this site's homepage NSFSCW (not safe for small children watching, LOL)

Quit DABBLING!

There are Children and you espouse an e-addiction.

I've got a passion for

I've got a passion for notebooks. I buy one and a few month later I sell it and buy another one. I'm at my 11th notebook as we speak. The next one will be a Lenovo. After I get that one I'm gonna lay low for a while.

I've got a passion for STEREO GEAR...

Building speakers is FUN, repairing equipment is a pain in the AMP.

PS WHY do folks go all the way back to last year for threads?

Are the latest one that crappy that you'll find blogs that have ENDED months ago, and I mean the writer SPLIT or ENDED them?

pleo toy

More importantly, those who place orders with any retailer in the United States or directly with the Ugobe store, will receive their Pleos by the holidays.
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pleo

What good is ordering it from the UK? SPAM

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